The OECD defines trademarks as “words, symbols or other marks used by companies to distinguish their goods or services from those of others.” You can download sample trademark license agreements from our database. To do this, visit our sample license agreements page, enter “Brand” in the search bar and click “Download”. Are you ready to find trademark licensing rights for the market? Use the A Search field on the right to get started. If you`re wondering what a business-to-business brand transaction looks like, here`s an example: If you`re using the RoyaltyRange database, we`ll ask you what the features of the license fees you need are. This way, you know that the data we provide complies with comparability standards. For more information on royalties for brands, check out our blog: What are royalties? Regardless of the method you use to calculate trademark license fees, you should always compare your rates with comparable market license fees to ensure that your royalties are fair and accurate. Brands are also often licensed in merchandising agreements (when a brand like Disney allows a clothing manufacturer to print T-shirts with Disney characters) and franchise agreements (when a trademark holder will grant the rights to its brand values and business model, allowing a franchisee to essentially replicate their business and run it like their own). The reference to third-party royalties can help you determine fair transfer pricing for intercompany`s transactions with brands. To do this effectively, you need to make sure that the uncontrolled transactions you analyze are sufficiently comparable to your transaction. For big brands, brands can become so well-known that they enter everyday language. The OECD cites the example of Kleenex, which today is often used for any type of handkerchief.

Google is another trademark of this type: the verb “search a little on Google” is today often used for Internet search, regardless of the search engine used. Trademark licensing agreements will also encircr the terms of use of the trademark in order to preserve its quality. After all, the value of the brand lies in its good reputation. A trademark gives the trademark owner the exclusive right to manufacture, sell and market goods using the assets protected by the trademark in an agreed geographical area. It gives the trademark owner the right to sue any organization or person who uses the trademark without his permission. When a trademark owner decides to grant his trademark, he signs a trademark license agreement with the licensee. It sets out the terms of the licence as well as the royalties for the granting of trademark licences. . . .

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